Lavoire Beauty

Creative, Natural and Inexpensive DIY Beauty Solutions

PROTEIN-RICH ALOE VERA GEL (HAIR MASK AND STYLING GEL)

This is a wonderful DIY styling and holding gel that won’t look greasy, dry out your hair or go flaky when it sets. It also works great as a wash-out hair mask when you need that protein mask to give your hair a boost. What’s more, it is also 100% natural, and so easy to make!

* Please Note: Following a comment on a previous post, I should mention that the recipe for the home-made Protein-Rich Aloe Vera Hair Mask and Styling Gel is at the end of this post. Please scroll down to view.

What You’ll Need To Do It Yourself:

(1) FRESH ALOE VERA LEAVES

Aloe Barbadensis, True Aloe or Aloe Vera

Aloe Barbadensis, True Aloe or Aloe Vera

What it is: With about 400 different species of the succulent aloe plant known to man, Aloe Barbadensis (aloe vera, true aloe or genuine aloe) is most commonly used in alternative medicinal practices and cosmetics. Aloe Barbadensis or aloe vera is a short-stemmed plant species native to Northern Africa. Its leaves are thick and fleshy and close their pores during the dry seasons to prevent moisture loss. Known as the “plant of immortality” in antiquity, it was used for its therapeutic and healing properties by ancient Greek, Egyptian, Roman, Chinese and Indian cultures, with the earliest known record of its application scribed on an ancient Sumerian tablet dating back to 2100 BC.

Why you’ll love it: Aloe vera extracted from either the mucilage gel or rind of the leaf contains up to eight amino acids needed but not manufactured by the human body. Aloe vera contains analgesic enzymes, bradykinase and salicylic acid (found in aspirin) which have anti-inflammatory, pain-relieving and anti-bacterial properties.

For centuries, aloe vera has been used as a topical application to treat eczema, psoriasis, minor wounds, burns, skin irritations, mouth and cold sores, minor vaginal irritations, etc. Aloe vera acts as a moisturizer, hydration of the skin. Upon absorption by the skin, it has rejuvenating properties and causes the fibroblast cells (which amazingly produce collagen and elastin) to regenerate at a faster rate. This in turn gives the skin a younger, smoother appearance.

Aloe vera leaves may be boiled in a pan of water and the vapors breathed in as a home remedy for asthma.

When ingested (made into a beverage and taken internally), aloe vera is used to combat the symptoms of constipation, ulcers, diabetes, headaches, arthritis and coughs. Internal ingestion of aloe vera has however been known to cause diarrhea in some people.

* Remember: Fresh aloe vera juice and gel are best used when applied or ingested fresh from harvested leaves. However, extracts may be refrigerated for a limited amount of time or stored in the form of ice cubes.

* Caution: The yellow sap of the aloe vera leaf contains toxins and laxatives such as aloin and aloe-emodin, which can be irritants both on the skin and in the stomachs of people who are latex-intolerant. To counter these effects, aloe vera leaves can be processed in a number of ways, all of which will convert the aloin and aloe-emodin into natural and awesome salicylic acid. Some of these processes include: distillation, freeze-drying, cold processing, flash pasturization and heating. In this recipe, I use the boiling method. If you are extremely allergic to latex, avoid skin irritations and intestinal problems when applying or ingesting aloe vera by only using the mucilage gel of the leaf, and using a proper extraction technique.

Why use it in this recipe: The enzymes and acids contained within the succulent leaves of the aloe vera plant are known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal and alkalizing qualities. The gel-like composition of aloe vera allows it to easily penetrate the length of the hair shaft, making it a fantastic conditioning agent. Therefore, the topical application of aloe vera will reduce redness and inflammation, eliminate bacteria and break down dead skin cells. This in turn means that using aloe vera on the hair will reduce dandruff, reduce irritation and soothe sensitive scalps. It will also condition the hair and promote hair growth by eliminating the buildup of sebum on the scalp and hair follicle. The ancient Egyptians were among the first to use aloe vera in the treatment of hair loss and to this date, it is still used in the treatment of alopecia and psoriasis. The alkalizing property of aloe vera juice and gel can also be used to bring the pH of the hair and scalp to a more desirable level. It also helps with water and moisture retention, meaning that it won’t dry out your hair.

* Note: See below for instructions & pictures on how to extract aloe vera gel and juice from fresh leaves

What’s the alternative: In this recipe I will be extracting the aloe vera juice and gel from the rind and mucilage gel of freshly cut leaves of an aloe vera plant. If for any reason obtaining this is not an option for you, the alternatives to freshly extracted aloe gel & juice are the store-bought equivalents. Ensure that you purchase 100% pure (or as close to this as possible) aloe vera gel and aloe vera juice by closely examining the content or ingredient list of any purchase you may be planning to make. Some products claim to be 100% pure aloe vera; however, if you scrutinize the list of ingredients, you may find that they are filled with preservatives, additives and other undesirable extras that lower the purity of the product.

100% Pure Store-Bought Aloe Vera Gel

100% Pure Store-Bought Aloe Vera Gel

99.8% Pure Store-Bought Aloe Vera Juice

99.8% Pure Store-Bought Aloe Vera Juice

(2) ROSEMARY LEAVES

Rosmarinus Officinalis

Rosmarinus Officinalis

What it is: Rosemarinus Officinalis (rosemary) is a woody perennial shrub with pine-scented leaves. It derives its name from the Latin “ros marinus”, which is translated to “dew of the sea”.

Rosemary has been associated with Aphrodite and the Virgin Mary among others.

In the past, the different parts of the rosemary shrub (known as a symbol of wisdom, loyalty, love and good faith) were used in a myriad of ways: tea brewed from the plant’s colorful flowers was an all-purpose medicine; the needle-like leaves boiled in white wine made a face wash; leafy twigs placed beneath a pillow before bed were said to guard against night terrors; the embers from burned twigs were used in a paste to clean teeth; wreaths entwined using the flowers, leaves and twigs were exchanged by marrying couples in the place of wedding bands and adorned the bride’s head; rosemary seedlings were planted on graves; incense was burned from the stems along with juniper berries during epidemics to purify the air, prevent the plague and repel insects; it was used to medicate bandages before application to the wound; et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Rosemary was used by ancient healers in Hebrew, Egyptian, Roman and Greek cultures

Hildegard von Bingen (b.1098, d.1179) was known as the first herbalist and naturopath of the middle ages. Her book which documented over 12,000 herbal remedies to cull the symptoms of different diseases includes rosemary as one of the ‘miracle’ herbs.

In recent years, the leaves of the rosemary shrub are still used in traditional cures, therapeutic remedies and modern cosmetics.

Why you’ll love it: Rosemary is rich in biologically active compounds and including antioxidants such as carnosic acid, rosmarinic acid (polyphenol from plants in the mint family), iron, calcium, vitamins, camphor, natural organic compounds like pinene, eucalyptol, verbenone and many others. These wonderful nutrients make rosemary extracts excellent for both skin and hair care, improving the skin and hair quality through its rejuvenating, regenerating and stimulating properties.

The naturally powerful antioxidants make rosemary extracts effective in anti-aging and toning products by inhibiting the effects and activities of free radicals. Rosemary has mild skin lightening effects which help to correct age spots and blemishes naturally.

It also helps with cell growth and improves circulation by stimulating blood flow.

The herb has powerful acerbic properties that effectively reduce oil on skin. The anti-inflammatory, disinfectant and antibiotic properties make rosemary effective in reducing swelling, treating acne and skin irritations or conditions as seen with eczema, psoriasis and dermatitis even on sensitive skin.

Topically, rosemary extracts can be massaged onto the skin and scalp to fight the effects of oily skin, rid the skin of dry skin cells and aid with toning the skin and scalp. Infused in oil, the herb is effective in treating cold limbs, aches and pains. Rosemary oil is effective when added to a warm bath to ease muscular tension and aid with relaxation.

Internally, fresh rosemary may be brewed with tea and ingested to aid with circulation and blood flow. It helps with poor digestion and gall bladder inflammation. It is also a useful mouthwash and gargle especially to fight a sore throat.

The carnosic acid (also found in the herb sage) in rosemary is also said to fight free radical damage to the brain, which in turn helps with improving memory.

*Cautionary Note: Taking rosemary internally is not recommended for those suffering from epilepsy or high blood pressure. It is also not advisable in large doses for use by pregnant women or those breast-feeding.

Why use it in this recipe: The wonderful properties of rosemary make it not only perfect for skin but scalp and hair care too. Extracts from the herb stimulate hair growth, aiding in hair loss recovery. Massaged onto the scalp, it is also great for combating dandruff and keeping the scalp healthy and free from bacteria.

Boiled in water or infused in vinegar, fresh rosemary can be used to make great conditioning hair rinses.

As a fantastic free bonus, rosemary will leave your hair smelling delightfully piney and fresh!

What’s the alternative: In this recipe, I will be brewing fresh rosemary leaves to get a sort of tea or juice to mix in with the extracted aloe vera. If you’re unable to get fresh leaves, you may buy 100% rosemary juice or extract from a store. It this is still not an option for you, you could skip this ingredient and make your hair gel with just the aloe vera.

(3) UNFLAVORED GELATINE

Sachet of Unflavored Powdered Gelatine

Sachet of Unflavored Powdered Gelatine

What it is: Gelatine is an irreversibly hydrolyzed form of collagen obtained from various animal by-products and is classified as a foodstuff. Most gelatine comes from pig skin, bovine hides and the bones of animals.

Gelatine is used as a gelling agent in food, pharmaceuticals, photography and in the manufacture of cosmetics. It is found in many gummy candies, marshmallows, gelatin desserts and some ice-creams, dips and yogurts.

Why you’ll love it: Gelatine is a great source of protein and amino acids that help build muscle. When ingested, it is also a wonderful source of dietary collagen which can help tighten loose skin and is rumored to aid with cellulite. It also helps with joint recovery. Gelatine also supports the regeneration of skin cells and in hair and nail growth. It improves digestion by binding with water and helping food move along the digestive tract.

Powdered Gelatine

Powdered Gelatine

Why use it in this recipe: The binding and gelling properties of food grade gelatine make it perfect for a homemade hair gel. The gelatine will hold your hair in place just like any store bought hair gel, but without the additives and it will not flake or look greasy once it sets.

What’s the alternative: Household gelatine comes in the form of sheets, granules or powder. In this recipe I will be using powdered, unflavored gelatin which I feel works best for me. However if you’ve got it in granules or sheets, that would work great as well.

Muslim halal and Jewish kosher customs require gelatin from sources other than pigs. Kosher gelatine is available in lots of stores for those of you who require this. Most kosher gelatines are also vegan!

Hindu and Jain customs require gelatin from sources other than animals. There are many companies that do make food grade gelatines that use plant-based materials.

If you’re interested in an alternative to gelatine as a whole, you may want to try agar agar. This is a flavorless gelling agent derived from cooked and pressed seaweed, and comes available in bars, flakes and in powdered form. Substitute gelatine with equal portions of agar agar.

Store-Bought Agar Agar

Store-Bought Agar Agar

(4) OMEGA-3 OIL, ROSEMARY and TEA TREE ESSENTIAL OILS (optional)

I chose to add a small amount of omega-3 and some essential oils to this recipe for three main reasons; (1) to enhance moisturizing and other qualities of the hair gel, (2) to allow the hair gel to keep for a longer period of time without going rancid and (3) to add a pleasant scent to the finished product.

The rosemary and tea tree essential oils can be purchased from any health or beauty stores. For the omega-3 oil, I simply prick one or two dietary supplement capsules and squeeze the contents out.

What’s the alternative: You may omit these ingredients from your hair gel. However, if you chose to add oils, you may replace the omega-3 oil with pure cod liver oil, fish oil or even vitamin E oil. You may also use any essential oils that you’ve got in your home. Keep in mind that essential oils come in different grades. Grade A essential oils are of pure therapeutic quality and are best for skin and hair care use.

* Note: You can find out more about the different grades of essential oils here

Some essential oils well-known for their benefits regarding hair health care – rosemary, lavender, lemon, geranium, cedar wood, thyme, clary sage, basil, eucalyptus, lemongrass, ylang ylang, peppermint, myrrh, patchouli, and tea tree. 

(5) DISTILLED WATER, and a few small CONTAINERS

How To Extract Aloe Vera Gel, Aloe Vera Juice and Rosemary Tea from Aloe and Rosemary Leaves:

Aloe vera gel is extracted from the mucilage gel (the fleshy, gummy inside) of the leaves.

1. Run cool water over 5 or 6 aloe vera leaves to clean off any soil or dirt that may have accumulated on the plant.

Aloe Vera Leaf, Washed

Aloe Vera Leaf, Washed

Aloe Vera Leaves

Aloe Vera Leaves

2. Using a sharp knife, trim off the skin of one side of the leaf. Alternatively, use the knife to split the leaf into two sections from one tip to the other (just like you’re filleting fish)

Extracting Aloe Vera Gel, Cutting the Leaf

Extracting Aloe Vera Gel, Cutting the Leaf

3. With a spoon, slowly scoop out the mucilage gel within each leaf.

Extracting Aloe Vera Gel, Spooning out the Mucilage Gel

Extracting Aloe Vera Gel, Spooning out the Mucilage Gel

Extracting Aloe Vera Gel, Spooning out the Mucilage Gel

Extracting Aloe Vera Gel, Spooning out the Mucilage Gel

4. Place the extracted gel in a bowl and set the spent leaves aside for later use.

Freshly Extracted Aloe Vera Gel

Freshly Extracted Aloe Vera Gel

5. Blend the extracted gel into a fluid.

Blended Aloe Vera Gel

Blended Aloe Vera Gel

6. To store any excess gel that you may not use, pour the blended gel into an ice-cube tray and pop it into the freezer until it sets.

Aloe Vera Gel Ready To Freeze

Aloe Vera Gel Ready To Freeze

Once frozen, remove the cubes and put them in a plastic or Ziploc bag and label. This will make it easy to thaw out individual cubes whenever you need them for any reason.

Aloe Vera Gel Ice Cubes

Aloe Vera Gel Ice Cubes

Aloe Vera Gel Ice Cubes, Stored and Labelled

Aloe Vera Gel Ice Cubes, Labelled for Storage

Aloe vera juice is made by extracting the remaining gel and sap contained within the leaves of the plant.

Rosemary tea or juice is made by infusing the rosemary leaves and flowers in water or oil.

1. Place the spent aloe vera leaves in a pan and cover completely with water. If possible, use distilled water. Bring to boil. Boiling the aloe vera leaf and sap converts the toxins and laxatives in the sap into natural salicylic acid, making the extract safe for use.

* Caution: DO NOT ingest or apply the yellow sap when raw. There are various methods of processing (e.g. boiling) to convert the toxins and laxatives in the sap into salicylic acid. If you are extremely allergic to latex skip this step and only brew the rosemary tea.

Aloe Vera, Distilled Water in Pan

Aloe Vera, Distilled Water in Pan

In a separate pan, do the same with the leaves of about 4 or 5 sprigs of rosemary (depending on the length) and if desired, some rosemary flowers.

Rosemary, Distilled Water Boiling

Rosemary, Distilled Boiling Water

2. Once the water boils, you may reduce the heat applied and simmer until the water changes color and the leaves appear limp and spent. This may take 30 minutes or longer depending on the number of aloe leaves or amount of rosemary used.

Brewing Aloe Vera Juice

Brewing Aloe Vera Juice

Brewing Rosemary Tea

Brewing Rosemary Tea

Alternatively, to make the aloe vera juice (1) chop the spent leaves into smaller pieces, (2) blend the leaves to a pulp and finally (3) boil the blended pulp.

Alternative way to prepare Aloe Vera Juice

Alternative way to prepare Aloe Vera Juice

3. Leave out to cool then strain the liquid from both pans.

Aloe Vera Juice

Aloe Vera Juice

Rosemary Tea

Rosemary Tea

If you like, you may mix the two liquids together to make an Aloe & Rosemary Juice. If not, store separately.

Aloe Vera and Rosemary Extracts

Aloe Vera and Rosemary Extracts

Because this juice will not keep fresh for too many weeks even if refrigerated, use the same method as with the aloe vera gel to create iced cubes that will last longer and are easy to use on demand.

How To Make Your Protein-Rich Aloe Vera Gel:

Step One:

–           1 cup fresh Aloe & Rosemary Juice (or 3/4 cup aloe vera juice and 1/4 cup rosemary tea)

–          1 and ½ tsp (teaspoons) of unflavored gelatine powder (For a stronger hold, use 2 tsp or 2 and ½ tsp)

1 cup Aloe & Rosemary Juice

1 cup Aloe & Rosemary Juice

1 and 1/2 tsp Unflavored Gelatine Powder

1 and 1/2 tsp Unflavored Gelatine Powder

1. Put aside 3 to 4 tbsp (tablespoons) of the 1 cup of Aloe & Rosemary Juice and heat up the remainder

2. In a bowl, combine in the 3 to 4 tbsp of cool Aloe & Rosemary Juice with the unflavored gelatine powder and using a fork, mix well

Gelatine mixed with room temperature Aloe & Rosemary Juice

Gelatine mixed with room temperature Aloe & Rosemary Juice

3. Pour in the heated Aloe & Rosemary Juice and stir until the gelatine is completely dissolved

Gelatine mixed with hot Aloe & Rosemary Juice

Gelatine mixed with hot Aloe & Rosemary Juice

4. Put the mixture into the freezer and leave it to set. This may take up to 45 minutes.

Step Two:

–          Previously refrigerated gelatine and Aloe & Rosemary Juice mixture

–          5 tbsp fresh Aloe & Rosemary Juice

–          5 tbsp fresh aloe vera gel

–          10 drops omega-3 oil (optional)

–          5 drops rosemary essential oil (optional)

–          5 drops tea tree essential oil (optional)

(Top) Hand-held Blender, (Bottom L to R) Omega-3 Capsules, Aloe&Rosemary Juice Gelatine, Aloe Vera Gel, Aloe&Rosemary Juice, Essential Oil

(Top) Hand-held Blender, (Bottom L to R) Omega-3 Capsules, Aloe&Rosemary Juice Gelatine, Aloe Vera Gel, Aloe&Rosemary Juice, Essential Oil

1. Combine the ingredients in a bowl and blend together until fluid.

Aloe & Rosemary Juice Gelatine

Aloe & Rosemary Juice Gelatine

Blending the Hair Gel Ingredients Together

Blend the Hair Gel Ingredients Together

2. The Protein-Rich Aloe Vera Gel is ready to use and may be poured directly into a container for storage. Keep refrigerated between uses

Pour the Hair Gel into a Container for Storage

Pour the Hair Gel into a Container for Storage

* Remember: Just like most other anti-oxidants, the polyphenols in the fresh aloe and rosemary in the recipe will start to lose their activity slowly the longer they are exposed to air. This means that this wonderful Protein-Rich Aloe Vera Gel works best when freshly made and applied to the hair!

Homemade Aloe Vera Hair Gel

Homemade Aloe Vera Gel

Aloe Vera Hair Gel

Homemade Aloe Vera Hair Gel

 Because there are no industrial-strength preservatives used in this recipe, its shelf life will not be as long as its store-bought equivalents. Therefore, to store any excess Protein-Rich Aloe Vera Gel that you may not use immediately, pour the blended mix into an ice-cube tray and freeze it until set.

Aloe Vera Hair Gel in Ice Cube Tray

Aloe Vera Hair Gel in Ice-Cube Tray

 Once frozen, remove the cubes, put them in a plastic or Ziploc bag and label and store in the freezer. This will make it easy to thaw out individual cubes whenever you need to apply the gel to your hair.

Aloe Vera Hair Gel Ice Cubes

Aloe Vera Hair Gel Ice-Cubes

Aloe Vera Hair Gel Labelled for Storage

Aloe Vera Hair Gel Labelled for Storage

How To Use Your Protein-Rich Aloe Vera Gel:

1. If you previously froze the hair gel, thaw (at room temperature) one cube in a small container. Depending on how much product you require for each application, this should last a couple of days. Keep refrigerated between uses

Thawing Out An Aloe Vera Hair Gel Ice Cube for Use

Thawing Out An Aloe Vera Hair Gel Ice Cube at Room Temperature for Use

Thawing Out An Aloe Vera Hair Gel Ice Cube for Use

Aloe Vera Hair Gel Ice Cube Thawed Out for Use

2. Once thawed, use the gel to style hair as you would any ordinary store-bought mild styling or holding gel.

3.Allow the hair gel a few moments to dry/set.

 

To use as a Hair Mask:

1. Same as step 1. above

2. Make sure that your hair is completely detangled and apply generous amounts of the aloe vera gel to clean hair, finger-combing it through

3. Allow the gel 15 to 20 minutes to set and completely harden, then rinse out with luke-warm water.

4. Condition and style your hair as desired

 

And… it’s as easy as that.

Hope you all love this recipe as much as (if not more than) I do!

Please feel free to comment, ask questions or send me feedback. I would love to hear back from you. Tell me how your Slick Aloe Vera Hair Styling Gel turns out!

* Bonus 1: For a simple, inexpensive peel that will be gentle on your skin, thaw out one hair gel ice-cube and apply it to your face avoiding contact with the eyes. Relax for 15-20 minutes as the mask sets. Once it is tight and completely dry, peel the mask off your face. This will lift off any excess oils and dirt, and keep your face from developing those black heads.

* Bonus 2: I came across a post with a brilliantly clever and unconventional and way you can put the rest of your gelatine powder to use

18 comments on “PROTEIN-RICH ALOE VERA GEL (HAIR MASK AND STYLING GEL)

  1. Pingback: Formaldehyde and Other Chemical Crappage in Hair Products (Plus Bonus Easy DIY Hair Recipes!) – Miss Diagnoses

  2. vinaynath
    February 26, 2017

    Just read. Very intersting and useful

    • Lavoire Beauty
      April 13, 2017

      @ vinaynath: Thanks for the feedback. Glad you liked the post ☺

  3. Amelia
    October 23, 2016

    This was awesome! I learnt a lot. Thanks for sharing. I am not sure if you commented but missed it: How long does this gel last for while you take it in and out of the refridgerator? A week? Two weeks?
    And how often do you recommend that we use the gel within a week? Would applying it daily mean too much protein?

    • Lavoire Beauty
      January 30, 2017

      @Amelia: Thank you so much for visiting my blog and commenting… I apologise that it took me so long to get back to you. You will be able to keep the cleanser for a couple of weeks, 2 or 3 refrigerated without it going bad as long as you use clean utensils and don’t contaminate the container. It definitely lasts a lot longer if you freeze it in small portions, that way you can keep it frozen for over a month. However, I would advise that you make small batches depending on how much you use, and keep it in the fridge for maximum 1 to 2 weeks. Remember that the longer the polyphenols remaon chilled, the quicker they will lose their constitution and won’t work as well as those in freshly made batches.
      Using small amounts of this daily may give your hair too much protein because of the gelatine and your hair may end up feeling drier and harder than usual by the end of the week. You could wash it off every day to add moisture. If you do not want to do this, then I would suggest that you add very small amounts of the gel during use. Or perhaps attempt to create a batch without the gelatine and see whether this holds your hair as desired.
      Thanks again for your comment. I hope that this helps 🙂

  4. Kelsey
    September 14, 2016

    Can you get the aloe vers juice( the leaves) without add distilled water? Won’t the juice from the leave squeeze out and create the juice to be boiled? Or do we have to add water to it to get the juice ?Please reply

    • Lavoire Beauty Co.
      September 14, 2016

      @Kelsey: Thanks for your comment and your question. The aloe leaves do have a little bit of sap that might come out. However, the reason behind using the water is so that we can boil the leaves to extract the beneficial juices and heat out the harmful substances within the leaves. Without the water, I don’t really think that the sap within the leaves is enough to create a lot of liquid. If you don’t want to add too much water, try the method where you blend the leaves into a pulp then boil the pulp. That way you won’t have to add much water (although I have found that in order to blend the leaves, you will need a little bit). You can also use regular tap water for this, however depending on how the water in your area is treated, it could contain too many chemicals, be hard water, or contain impurities. I still use unfiltered tap water for some of my recipes sometimes though. I hope that this helps. Feel free to get back to me with any additional questions.

  5. Anonymous
    August 25, 2015

    It looks fabulous! I already make gelatine hair gel with rosemary essential oils, and the results are great. I would like to make your gel, but I dont have any aloe plants, but I do have bought pure organic aloe gel in a pot…Can I substitute this recipe with my aloe gel from the pot, and how many teaspoons should I add would you advise? Thanks for any help x

    • Lavoire Beauty Co.
      September 20, 2015

      @ Anonymous: Thanks for your comment. And yes, store bought aloe gel will work just as well as freshly extracted gel from the plant. Do make sure that the gel you buy is 100% pure though. Four (4) to five (5) tablespoons of the pure gel should do fine. I hope this helps.

  6. Ghislaine
    January 30, 2015

    Can this gel be used as the gel hairdressers use on wet hair to fluff and curl shorter hair with hands.

    • Lavoire Beauty Co.
      May 8, 2015

      @ Ghislaine: To use this gel for the purpose of fluffing and curling shorter hair, use minimal amounts. This will prevent the hair from becoming spikey. The gel can be used on wet or damp hair, but it will take longer to set than a chemical / store-bought gel. I will be posting an alternative DIY all natural gel in a few days so you can look out for that if you’re interested. I hope this helps. Thanks for reading the post, and for your comment.

  7. GUPTA KCB
    December 6, 2014

    Very informative and easy to use methods. Always thought that the Aloe Vera laves after removing the core gelly matter is useless. Now I know I need not throw it any more. Can I use preservative like Sodium Bromite to stretch the shelf life of these homemade Aloe Vera products?

    • Lavoire Beauty Co.
      December 10, 2014

      @ GUPTA KCB: Thanks for checking out my post. I’m glad you found it informative. I am not very clear on the use of sodium bromide as a preservative in cosmetic products, but I do know that it is sometimes used to preserve wood. I would suggest you make small batches and try to get some organic or natural preservatives and anti-microbials like Geranium essential oil, Rosemary oil extract and Vitamin E T-50 oil. These oils and extracts will slightly extend the shelf life of your products. However, I would still suggest making and refrigerating small batches that you can use fairly quickly.

  8. Monaliza Soares
    March 10, 2014

    Wonderful!

  9. rohan
    January 6, 2014

    nice

  10. Pingback: ‘FOUR HERBS’ MIX FOR BEAUTIFUL & HEALTHY SKIN AND HAIR (Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Neem) | Lavoire Beauty

We'd Love to Hear from You...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: